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Old 02-05-2009, 01:35 PM   #5
Tsuna
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Re: Korean | Hangeul | 한국어

Quote:
Originally Posted by playafosho99
For the letters that have 2 sounds i.e. ㄷ[ㄸ] - "d, t" how do we know which one to use w/ what word...

Also this should be interesting, learning Korean that is
For the d/t thing, it doesn't matter which one you use, to be honest. Like I said, the romanizations for those letters are interchangeable.

Like for instance, the word 예뻐 or . (예뻐 means "pretty", means "clumsy/mistake".)

These two words are usually romanized as "yeppeo" and "ddil". But in both cases, it could also be romanized as "yebbeo" and "ttil". The only reason the former romanizations are more commonly used is because the words themselves, to English speakers, sound more like they're using "pp" and "dd" than "bb" and "tt".

To put it simply, the only reason the romanization changes for the D/T, G/K, and B/P characters are because of English speakers trying to spell out Korean words phonetically. In truth, there is really very little difference between the sounds in Korean when they're spoken - but for English speakers learning to pronounce Korean, it's easier for them to assimilate the romanizations to English phonetics, which is why the spellings change when words are romanized.

Either way is correct, technically.

But commonly, this is the rule I've noticed people following as far as double consonants go:

If the double consonant is at the BEGINNING of a word, such as in , you use the softer tone of the letters. (Softer tones are DD, BB, and GG.) If the double consonant is at the END or in the MIDDLE of a word, you use the harder tone of the letters. (Harder tones are TT, PP, and KK.)

This also applies to the consonant for R & L. As with double consonants, is romanized as R at the beginning of a word, and romanized as L at the middle or end of a word.

Last edited by Tsuna; 02-05-2009 at 01:38 PM.
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