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Old 11-08-2010, 02:09 PM   #1
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Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

Changing Education Paradigms

A nice little post-animated lecture by Sir Ken Robinson. Discussing the who, what, and why of our current educational standards. He Illustrates how important concepts not yet part of that system should be, and "challenges assumptions about learning"

Just under 12min run-time.
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Old 11-08-2010, 04:56 PM   #2
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Re: Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

I fear that many people will see this as an argument in favour of today's increasingly individualist approach to education. Let the children learn what they want, keep them interested in education by allowing them the freedom to choose their curriculum. What many people fail to understand is that, despite being painted in a negative light by Sir Robinson, there frequently is one answer. It is certainly incredibly important for children and teens to learn that there are multitudes of ways to solve many problems, but teaching them this must be done very carefully. The last thing we need is an entire generation unable to discern the difference between concrete fact and whimsical opinion or belief.
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:40 PM   #3
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Re: Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

You don't think because I posted it, I mean to agree verbatim? That is not the case. It was front page when I logged on at lunch, and thought it was interesting.

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I fear that many people will see this as an argument in favour of today's increasingly individualist approach to education. Let the children learn what they want, keep them interested in education by allowing them the freedom to choose their curriculum. What many people fail to understand is that, despite being painted in a negative light by Sir Robinson, there frequently is one answer.
I agree with you that the concept of a heavily individualized education system should not be taken into consideration lightly. Taking it one step further, that logistically at a point it would not even be feasible.

Nonetheless I don't see the harm in close evaluation of the system in place. Agreeing with Ken Robinson on his point of kids having different learning styles, and it being critical to at least try to have an environment accommodating to all. Personally I have always leaned towards an auditory learning experience, enjoying verbal interaction through discussion above others. Plus someone like me who took my time in school for granted. It was not until after I graduated from high school that a real appreciation for the opportunity came about.

Many things should be standard with out a doubt. History, the Sciences basic Maths including Algebra/Geometry. English classes for reading comprehension, vocab, and literary interpretation. Beyond those which we can consider necessary to produce a well rounded individual. Perhaps another more adaptive, and interactive curriculum can be created that co-exists along side the 'standard'. One that is capable of identifying and grouping children with like abilities/interests/learning styles(though I can see that being a slippery slope). Having the flexibility to cater to needs not present in the 'standard'.

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It is certainly incredibly important for children and teens to learn that there are multitudes of ways to solve many problems, but teaching them this must be done very carefully. The last thing we need is an entire generation unable to discern the difference between concrete fact and whimsical opinion or belief.
Agreed. Like I stated in the debates section. Lateral thinking or "divergent" as he said. Is a powerful and often integral part of problem solving process. As it helps imagine new and possibly fruitful roads to travel. However without a logical process to follow after the fact. It is difficult to progress along any of said roads.

Last edited by Axiom; 11-08-2010 at 10:14 PM.
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Old 11-08-2010, 11:38 PM   #4
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Re: Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

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Originally Posted by Axiom View Post
You don't think because I posted it, I mean to agree verbatim? That is not the case. It was front page when I logged on at lunch, and thought it was interesting.
I did not at all mean to imply that was was the case.


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Originally Posted by Axiom View Post
I agree with you that the concept of a heavily individualized education system should not be taken into consideration lightly. Taking it one step further, that logistically at a point it would not even be feasible.

Nonetheless I don't see the harm in close evaluation of the system in place. Agreeing with Ken Robinson on his point of kids having different learning styles, and it being critical to at least try to have an environment accommodating to all. Personally I have always leaned towards an auditory learning experience, enjoying verbal interaction through discussion above others. Plus someone like me who took my time in school for granted. It was not until after I graduated from high school that a real appreciation for the opportunity came about.

Many things should be standard with out a doubt. History, the Sciences basic Maths including Algebra/Geometry. English classes for reading comprehension, vocab, and literary interpretation. Beyond those which we can consider necessary to produce a well rounded individual. Perhaps another more adaptive, and interactive curriculum can be created that co-exists along side the 'standard'. One that is capable of identifying and grouping children with like abilities/interests/learning styles(though I can see that being a slippery slope). Having the flexibility to cater to needs not present in the 'standard'.
Needs outside of the standard should definitely be considered and catered to, but there is a standard for a reason. The current educational model has not aged well, but the need for at least some semblance of a core set of educational values is a must. Western and Eastern cultures have vastly different philosophies concerning some of these core values, the most prominent of which is mathematics.

Western cultures believe that if you don't get math, then you're just not a math person. Eastern cultures on the other hand believe understanding math is just a matter of diligent work, more so for some than others. I consider this a prime example of the Western individualism convincing children that if they don't understand math, there's no point in trying because they're just not a "math person."

One of the major issues I have with society as a whole is the idea which most children have that the very basics of what they learn in school is useless. This is a far greater issue than anything within the actual education system itself, and what I would therefore consider more in need of reform.


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Agreed. Like I stated in the debates section. Lateral thinking or "divergent" as he said. Is a powerful and often integral part of problem solving process. As it helps imagine new and possibly fruitful roads to travel. However without a logical process to follow after the fact. It is difficult to progress along any of said roads.
Agreed. Divergent thinking should always be encouraged and taught along with basic logic. The students should be somewhat forced to make their own connections without relying on the teacher to say "No, do it this way." Things learned by reasoning them on your own are far more memorable than being told how the world works and being expected to simply believe it.
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Old 11-09-2010, 12:51 AM   #5
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Re: Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

That is all good shit. Just want to expand on this.

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One of the major issues I have with society as a whole is the idea which most children have that the very basics of what they learn in school is useless. This is a far greater issue than anything within the actual education system itself, and what I would therefore consider more in need of reform.
Did not even consider that as part of the equation, You may have hit the nail on the head. Instilling a motivation to learn would alone decrease many of the systemic issues being faced. I can vividly remember watching Bill Nye the Science guy thinking how awesome it would be to play his show in class. Not once as a child did I believe that trigonometry would end up part of my professional day to day duties. If kids today were shown how prevalent Math and, Science are in everyday life. Having it presented in an understandable format would make a difference for sure. Maybe Adam Savage would make a commercial "You cant be a Mythbuster if you cant do long division".

In regards to Motivation we may see some progress in the near future. If technological advancements from even the last decade could be incorporated, and properly utilized . Having an education system born of the industrial age forced to bare the weight derived from the needs of the information age is almost nonsensical to me.
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