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Old 10-15-2005, 12:57 PM   #1
highlord
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What do the suffixals mean? Naruto-kun

What do the different suffixals on names mean in the Japanese language? Like Naruto-kun and Naruto-chan.

Thanks

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Old 10-15-2005, 02:06 PM   #2
Itachi_Chidoi
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the ending suffixals of kuns means for the guys and chan is for the girls
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Old 10-15-2005, 02:09 PM   #3
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Isn't "chan" is use for girls and little kids?
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Old 10-15-2005, 02:25 PM   #4
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I asked my japanese teacher about these but his answer wasn't clear.
he said -kun for kids
-sama for more highly and respected people =(master,......)
but he didn't answered me about -chan.

but I noticed that u can use -kun for friends and close people, and -chan for umm...I donnu how to put it but it's like (jessica ----> jessy)


note: I didn't find better name

EDIT*****
Makoto_Duke_War_IV

I liked your signature's picture of garaa and lee. very funny.
I liked it very much.

*OffTheChain --Please quit spamming and double posting*
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Old 10-15-2005, 02:51 PM   #5
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Politeness levels
Gender notwithstanding, Japanese suffixes show various levels of respect, which we could compare to English as follow :

# san, sama 様 => Mr, Mrs, Miss
# dono 殿 > Sir, Madam
# kyou 卿 => Lord, Lady, Dame

Nevertheless, "sama" is used for Shinto gods ("kami-sama"). But as there are millions of them, they do not necessarily deserve the same respect or fear as the single and omnipotent Judeo-Christo-Islamic god.

The most referential titles are "denka" 殿下 and "heika" 陛下. The first one means "His/Her/Your Highness" and is used for royal/imperial family members. The second means "His/Her/Your Majesty" and is used for the Emperor or Empress - or King and Queen, in other monarchies around the world.
Everyday suffixes
In everyday life, "san" is the most common suffix. "-chan" is a more affectionate term, used mainly with friends, family members and children. "-tan" is a kind of slang version. "-kun" is usually reserved for boys or young men, but can sometimes be used for girls or young women too. There is also "-shi" 氏, which is an intermediary form between "san" and "sama" in terms of politeness, and is mostly used for professionals like engineers or lawyers.

Then comes "sensei" 先生, which is used for anybody with a knowledge superior to ours. It is most common for doctors, teachers and professors, but can also be used for politicians, martial arts masters, etc. Contrarily to other suffixes so far, "sensei" can be used alone, without a name before it, just like "doctor" or "professor" in English. So, one can say "Nomura-sensei" or just "Sensei", like one could say in English "Professor Nomura" or "Professor".

"Sempai" 先輩 is another very common way of addressing someone with more experience or a hierarchical superior. It can be used alone or after a name, like "sensei".

Name short-forms and noun combinations
It is very common for Japanese to use the first syllable of someone's name and combine it with a suffix. For example, "Mi-chan" could be the short-form of Miki, Michiko, Miko, Misa, Minato, Mickey, Minnie, etc.

Suffixes can also be used with some common nouns referring to a person. E.g. "kyaku-san" or "kyaku-sama" (customer, client, guest), "okaa-san" (mother) or, more informally, "okaa-chan" (mum, mom).
Combinations
Suffixes can also be combined in a more or less humoristical manner, like "-chama" (chan + sama), as in "obaa-chama" for "grand-mother", which is both affectionate and respectful. There is a lot of freedom in the possible combinations, which is the absolute opposite of "Mr, Mrs, Miss" in English, which are fixed and non interchangeable.

Impolite suffixes
Other less polite suffixes also exist. Their intensity depend a lot on the intonation and context, like "-baka" 馬鹿, or the ever ruder "-yarou" 野郎 (and combination "bakayarou", which is however normally used alone as an insult). So, "kyaku-yarou" would be a very impolite way of talking about a customer someone strongly dislikes. These can also be used individually, like in "ano yarou !" ("this a*shole !") or "baka !" ("mor@n" !)

(From http://www.jref.com/language/japanese_suffixes.shtml)
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Old 10-15-2005, 02:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasmi2004
Makoto_Duke_War_IV

I liked your signature's picture of garaa and lee. very funny.
I liked it very much.
thanks one thing you double post and your way off topic -____-
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Old 10-15-2005, 05:00 PM   #7
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Yes what Coribn117 said

In short:

Chan - reffered to girl, or a "imature" or "not grown-up" male/boy
Kun - reffering to a male, more mature too
sama - highly respected person, master

and secondly

Quit double posting!
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Old 10-15-2005, 07:59 PM   #8
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Thanks alot. I was trying to figure out what it meant when Hinata calls Naruto, Naruto-kun and Sakura call Naruto Naruto-chan. Makes sense now.
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